Thursday, 2 February 2017

Education Edge Office Read - Project Scope Knowledge Area - Office Read

Project Scope Management Office Read
Project Scope Management includes the processes required to ensure that the project includes all the work required, and only the work required, to complete the project successfully.

 

Managing the project scope is primarily concerned with defining and controlling what is and is not included in the project.

 

The knowledge area of Project Scope Management consists of the following seven processes:

 

Process Name
Project Management Process Group
Key Deliverables
Plan Scope Management
Planning
Scope Management Plan & Requirement Management Plan
Collect Requirement
Planning
Requirement Traceability Matrix
Define Scope
Planning
Project Scope Statement
Create WBS
Planning
Scope baseline
Validate Scope
Monitoring and Controlling
Accepted Deliverables
Control Scope
Monitoring and Controlling
Work Performance Information

 

        Product scope. The features and functions that characterize a product, service, or result

 

        Project scope. The work performed to deliver a product, service, or result with the specified features and functions.

 

        The scope baseline for the project is the approved version of the project scope statement, work breakdown structure (WBS), and its associated WBS dictionary

 

        A baseline can be changed only through formal change control procedures.

 

        Completion of the project scope is measured against the project management plan.

 

        Completion of the product scope is measured against the product requirements.

 


The Inputs, Tools and Techniques and Output of Plan Scope Management process are given below.

 

Project Management Plan
Expert Judgment
Scope Management Plan
Project Charter
Meetings
Requirements Management Plan
Enterprise Environmental Factors
 
 
Organizational Process Assets
 
 

 

  • Plan Scope Management is the process of creating a scope management plan that documents how the project scope will be defined, validated, and controlled.

 

  • This process describes how the scope will be defined, developed, monitored, controlled, and verified.

 

  • The requirements management plan is a component of the project management plan that describes how requirements will be analyzed, documented, and managed.

 


The Inputs, Tools and Techniques, and Outputs of the Collect Requirements process are given in the table below.

 

Scope Management Plan
Interviews
Requirements Documentation
Requirements Management Plan
Focus Groups
Requirements Traceability Matrix
Stakeholder Management Plan
Facilitated Workshops
 
Project Charter
Group Creativity Techniques
 
Stakeholder Register
Group Decision Making Techniques
 
 
Questionnaires and Surveys
 
 
Observations
 
 
Prototypes
 
 
Benchmarking
 
 
Context Diagrams
 
 
Document Analysis
 

 

  • Collect Requirements is the process of determining, documenting, and managing stakeholder needs and requirements to meet project objectives.

 

  • The project’s success is directly influenced by active stakeholder involvement in the discovery.

 

  • Requirements include conditions or capabilities that are to be met by the project.

 

  • Requirements can be grouped into classifications allowing for further refinement.

 

  • Requirements become the foundation of the WBS.

 

  • Interview is a formal or informal approach to elicit information from stakeholders by talking to them directly.

 

  • Focus groups bring together prequalified stakeholders and subject matter experts.

 

  • Facilitated workshops are focused sessions that bring key stakeholders together to define product requirements.

 

  • Brainstorming is a technique used to generate and collect multiple ideas related to project and product requirements. It is part of group creativity techniques.

 

  • A group decision-making technique is an assessment process having multiple alternatives with an expected outcome in the form of future actions. Examples are Unanimity, Majority, Plurality and Dictatorship.

 

  • Prototyping is a method of obtaining early feedback on requirements by providing a working model of the expected product before actually building it.

 

  • Benchmarking involves comparing actual or planned practices to best practices of comparable organizations (internal or external).

 

  • Requirements traceability matrix is a grid that links product requirements from their origin to the deliverables that satisfy them.

 


The Inputs, Tools and Techniques, and Outputs of the Define Scope process are given in the table below.

 

Scope Management Plan
Expert Judgment
Project Scope Statement
Project Charter
Product Analysis
Project Documents updates
Requirements Documentation
Alternatives Generation
 
Organizational Process Assets
Facilitated Workshops
 

 

  • Define Scope is the process of developing a detailed description of the project and product.

 

  • Define Scope process selects the final project requirements from the requirements documentation.

 

  • The preparation of a detailed project scope statement builds upon the major deliverables, assumptions, and constraints that are documented during project initiation

 

  • Product analysis includes techniques such as product breakdown, systems analysis, requirements analysis, systems engineering, value engineering, and value analysis.

 

  • Alternatives generation is a technique used to develop as many potential options as possible

 

  • The project scope statement is the description of the project scope, major deliverables, assumptions, and constraints.

 

 

 

 


The Inputs, Tools and Techniques, and Outputs of the Create WBS process are given in the table below.

 

Scope Management Plan
Decomposition
Scope Baseline
Project Scope Statement
Expert Judgment
Project Documents updates
Requirements Documentation
 
 
Enterprise Environmental Factors
 
 
Organizational Process Assets
 
 

 

  • Create WBS is the process of subdividing project deliverables and project work into smaller, more manageable components.

 

  • The WBS is a hierarchical decomposition of the total scope of work to be carried out by the project team to accomplish the project objectives and create the required deliverables.

 

  • The planned work is contained within the lowest level of WBS components, which are called work packages.

 

  • Decomposition is a technique used for dividing and subdividing the project scope and project deliverables into smaller, more manageable parts.

 

  • A WBS structure may be created through various approaches. Some of the popular methods include the top-down approach.

 

  • A bottom-up approach can be used during the integration of subcomponents.

 

  • The WBS represents all product and project work, including the project management work.

 

  • The total of the work at the lowest levels should roll up to the higher levels so that nothing is left out and no extra work is performed. This is sometimes called the 100 percent rule.

 

  • WBS usually follow 8/80 rule of decomposition.

 

  • Control accounts are placed at selected management points in the WBS.

 


The Inputs, Tools and Techniques, and Outputs of the Validate Scope process are given in the table below.

 

Project Management Plan
Inspection
Accepted Deliverables
Requirements Documentation
Group Decision Making Techniques
Change Requests
Requirements Traceability Matrix
 
Work Performance Information
Verified Deliverables
 
Project Documents Updates
Work Performance Data
 
 

 

Validate Scope is the process of formalizing acceptance of the completed project deliverables.

 

  • The verified deliverables obtained from the Control Quality process are reviewed with the customer or sponsor to ensure that they are completed satisfactorily.

 

  • The Validate Scope process differs from the Control Quality process.

 

  • Inspection includes activities such as measuring, examining, and validating to determine whether work and deliverables meet requirements and product acceptance criteria.

 

  • Deliverables that meet the acceptance criteria are formally signed off and approved by the customer or sponsor.

 


The Inputs, Tools and Techniques, and Outputs of the Control Scope process are given in the table below.

 

Project Management Plan
Variance Analysis
Work Performance Information
Requirements Documentation
 
Change Requests
Requirements Traceability Matrix
 
Project Management Plan Updates
Work Performance Data
 
Project Documents Updates
Organizational Process Assets
 
Organizational Process Assets updates

 

  • Control Scope is the process of monitoring the status of the project and product scope and managing changes to the scope baseline.

 

  • Controlling the project scope ensures all requested changes and recommended corrective or preventive actions are processed through the Perform Integrated Change Control process

 

  • The uncontrolled expansion to product or project scope without adjustments to time, cost, and resources is referred to as scope creep.

 

  • Variance analysis is a technique for determining the cause and degree of difference between the baseline and actual performance.

 

  • Project performance measurements are used to assess the magnitude of variation from the original scope baseline.

 

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